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June Employee Spotlight

Frank Rios is regional sales manager and a technical support agent who has worked with Wessels for over 9 years. Frank’s career began in the Navy and he later attended Ivy Tech to pursue a career in Business Management. He enjoys running, playing golf, basketball, and target shooting. When he’s not at work, he enjoys rooting for the Boston Celtics and the Denver Broncos. Frank is also very passionate about his family, friends, and work ethic.

Frank’s fast facts:

Favorite Color: Green
Favorite food: Steak
Likes: Traveling, basketball, golf, and target shooting
Dislikes: Liver, so don’t even ask!
Fun fact: Learned English age 12

Frank Rios
Regional Sales Mgr. / Support
e-mail: frios@westank.com
phone: 317-888-9800
cell: 317-696-1487

May Employee Spotlight

Grace Cramer is one of the new smiling faces in our Engineering Department. Grace holds the role of Product Design Engineer and has been with Wessels for 6 months. She enjoys traveling, cats, and playing board games, and she can even be found coding her own video games in her spare time.  Grace likes to root for her alma mater, Purdue, and she also watches the Colts during football season.

Grace’s fast facts:

Favorite Color: Purple
Favorite food: Pasta
Likes: Video games, cats, hot tea, and traveling
Dislikes: Cold weather, peanut butter, needles  
Fun fact: She’s a pescatarian

Grace Cramer
Product Engineer
e-mail: gcramer@westank.com
phone: 317-888-9800

October Employee Spotlight

Jay Fuller has been a consistently smiling face in the Wessels Company’s Marketing Department for the last 6 years. He has been the marketing manager for the last three years and his favorite part of his job is using new technologies to teach customers about Wessels products.  Jay graduated from Boston University.  In his free time, he can be found writing for an award-winning graphic novel series called The Cardboard Kingdom. He also enjoys writing, reading and gaming as well as virtual reality and graphic novels.

Jay fast facts:

Favorite color: Blue

Likes: virtual reality, video games and graphic novels

Favorite food: Impossible Burgers

Dislikes: bigotry and xenophobia

Hobbies: writing graphic novels

Nickname: Jay (full name is James)

Hidden talents: plays the piano and ukulele

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June Employee Spotlight

June Employee Spotlight

Frank Rios is regional sales manager and a technical support agent who has worked with Wessels for over 9 years. Frank’s career began in the Navy and he later attended Ivy Tech to pursue a career in Business Management. He enjoys running, playing golf, basketball, and target shooting. When he’s not at work, he enjoys rooting for the Boston Celtics and the Denver Broncos. Frank is also very passionate about his family, friends, and work ethic.

Frank’s fast facts:

Favorite Color: Green
Favorite food: Steak
Likes: Traveling, basketball, golf, and target shooting
Dislikes: Liver, so don’t even ask!
Fun fact: Learned English age 12

Frank Rios
Regional Sales Mgr. / Support
e-mail: frios@westank.com
phone: 317-888-9800
cell: 317-696-1487

May Employee Spotlight

May Employee Spotlight

Grace Cramer is one of the new smiling faces in our Engineering Department. Grace holds the role of Product Design Engineer and has been with Wessels for 6 months. She enjoys traveling, cats, and playing board games, and she can even be found coding her own video games in her spare time.  Grace likes to root for her alma mater, Purdue, and she also watches the Colts during football season.

Grace’s fast facts:

Favorite Color: Purple
Favorite food: Pasta
Likes: Video games, cats, hot tea, and traveling
Dislikes: Cold weather, peanut butter, needles  
Fun fact: She’s a pescatarian

Grace Cramer
Product Engineer
e-mail: gcramer@westank.com
phone: 317-888-9800

September Employee Spotlight

September Employee Spotlight

Megan McDaniel is one of the smiling faces in Wessels Company’s filtration department.  Megan has been with Wessels for about 9 years and has been our filtration purchasing manager for 4 years. She attended University of Southern Indiana and she has two children, both of whom have red hair and blue eyes.  When she’s not in the office, she enjoys watching movies, listening to music and competing at trivia night.  An interesting fact about Megan is that she writes, eats, and brushes her teeth left handed, but plays all sports with her right hand.  During football season, she roots for the Indianapolis Colts and the Chicago Bears.

Megan’s fast facts:

Favorite Color: Purple
Favorite Food: Mexican
Hobbies: Playing outside with her kids and trivia night
Nickname: Megmo Jackson

Megan McDaniel
Filtration Purchasing Manager
e-mail: mmcdaniel@westank.com
phone: 317-888-9800 ext. 1031
cell: 317-443-4154

How To: Acceptance Volume vs. Tank Volume

How To: Acceptance Volume vs. Tank Volume

Tank Volume: The overall volume of the tank, including air and water.

Acceptance Volume: The amount of water inside the tank.

Maximum Acceptance Volume: The maximum amount of fluid inside the tank before stretching the bladder/diaphragm.

Acceptance Factor: The percentage of of tank volume storing fluid, expressed as a decimal.

Drawdown Volume: The amount of water that is drawn out from a starting tank pressure down to the minimum pressure.

A tank’s drawdown volume is the amount of water that is stored between a high and low pressure, which is usually determined by a pump switch.  In real-world plumbing systems, the tank should not start at the maximum pressure and the air cushion pressure should not fall to zero.

The volume of water in a tank, called the acceptance volume, is sometimes expressed as a decimal or percentage against overall tank volume, called an acceptance factor. However, the tank should be charged on the tank’s air side to the minimum pressure needed within the system and filled to the maximum pressure in water required to adjust the tank’s pressure correctly. (pressure in the tank should be set accordingly: 10% below pump cut-in pressure (hydropneumatics); equal to pressure reducing valve pressure (hydronic), equal to line pressure (thermal – domestic water heater protection). As a standard, Wessels Company offers tanks pre-charged to 40 PSI, which can easily be adjusted and reduced in the field to fit the pressure needed within the system.

All replaceable bladder tanks Wessels offers are considered a full volume acceptance tanks, since the bladder inside can fully expand within the tank, allowing all the available space inside the tank to be used.  Fixed-diaphragm tanks are not full acceptance tanks because the diaphragm is confined to only a portion of the tank.

You can tell if a tank is a full acceptance tank by looking at its chart either online, on the submittal, or in the literature for each style of tank.  If the chart says tank volume, that means the usable volume inside the tank is the total volume of the tank.  For example, in a Wessels Company NLA series tank, the total volume of the tank is also the number of gallons the tank can hold, making the tank a full acceptance volume tank. A fixed-diaphragm tank like the NTA, however, lists both the tank volume and the maximum acceptance volume.

If you have more questions about tank volume and Wessels products, feel free to reach out by chatting with us in the chat window at the bottom right of our website, by emailing us at wessels@westank.com, or by calling our offices at 317-888-9800.

August Employee Spotlight!

August Employee Spotlight!

Guy Kirk has been part of the Wessels Company family for over 20 years!  He is the Vice President and East Coast Sales Manager.  He enjoys playing and watching all sports, particularly sailing and he loves eating seafood. In his spare time, he enjoys rooting for his favorite teams: New England Patriots, Boston Red Sox and the Indianapolis Pacers.

 

Guy fast facts:                                                                              
Favorite color:  Green

Favorite food: Steak and seafood

Likes: sports, sailing

Hobbies: rooting for and watching sports

How To: Understanding the Makeup of Glycol Makeup Packages

How To: Understanding the Makeup of Glycol Makeup Packages

How To: Understanding the Makeup of Glycol Makeup Packages

Wessels Company makes Glycol Makeup Packages in Glymatic, Single, Double, and Twin systems. The purpose of a GMP is to maintain system pressure.

In the sequence of operation in a system using a GMP, the glycol solution mixture is held in a solution container and then is pulled through a pump. The pump has an internal spring that utilizes a pressure relief valve, if the pressure in the system is too high. Fluid goes into the pump, the pressure is increased with a rotary vane, and then is discharged into the system at a higher pressure.

The package is protected by a low water cutoff probe in the solution container. Two probes are in the container and monitor the glycol mixture

level. If the level falls too low, the continuity between the offset probe is broken and the pump is shut off, which sounds an alarm.

The pump is controlled by a pressure switch, which is set to turn on at 60 psi and to cut off at 80 psi. The 80 psi of fluid is then stored in an expansion tank to hold the excess fluid. The expansion tank is a diaphragm tank that has a pre-charged pressurized air cushion, which helps maintain the pressure in the system to 80 psi.

The fluid then flows through a pressure reducing valve or PRV, which is set for the system’s required pressure. The valve’s range can go from 10 to 70 psi, which can be for whatever pressure your system needs.

Inside the PRV, a spring sets the tension that holds the valve open. The valve can be set to point downstream between 10 and 70 psi, the spring will hold the valve open until the downstream pressure equalizes the spring tension through the diaphragm, that will hold the diaphragm up and close the valve.

Wessels Company offers four different types of GMP systems: a glymatic, a single, duplex, and twin. A Glymatic system package is a free-standing solution reservoir that holds the glycol/water solution at atmospheric pressure. A pressure assembly is mounted on the solution reservoir’s cover keeping the pressurization unit off the floor. This GMP uses a pressure station to move fluid from a 6 or 15-gallon reservoir pressurized to between 1 and 25 psi, up to 130° F. The solution then remains stored until it is needed to replenish the system that has lost its glycol/water or water solution.

The single system GMP automatically services one closed-loop system. This GMP holds a reservoir of 50 or 100-gallons and 1/3 and 1/2 horse power pump pressurization control station with magnetic starter. The 1/3 HP is used for systems of 50 PSI pressure and the ½ HP station is used for systems up to 70 PSI.

The Duplex system or GMPD, services two separate closed-loop systems. This system is available with 50- or 100-gallon reservoir and 1/3 or ½ HP pump pressurization control also with magnetic starter.

The Twin system or GMPT also services one closed-loop system and is available with the 50 or 100-gallon reservoir with 1/3 or ½ HP pump.

However, a control panel with alternator and dual magnetic starter is used with this system to easily and automatically alternate between two pumps.

To see exactly how the GMP system works, you can watch our technical video, here.

You can also learn more about the GMPs, on our website, here.